DIY Tire Pressure Check

Taking care of your vehicle as a whole is important, and the easiest way to ensure your safety is by checking your tire pressure once a week. A fairly easy process, a tire check can alert you to low pressure, uneven wearing, and more.

Here’s a quick guide to a DIY tire pressure check from us here at Floyd Traylor Honda.

  • Temperature – Before you head out and check your tire pressure, make sure your tires are cold. The best time to check your tire pressure is in the morning or evening. Don’t check your tire pressure after you pull into your driveway. You won’t get an accurate reading.
  • Pressure – Check your owner’s manual or the inside of your driver’s door to determine what the manufacturer-suggested tire pressure is for your vehicle. Note that the pressure might differ between the front and rear tires and that the number on the tire might not match the manufacturer’s suggestion. When in doubt, go with the vehicle manufacturer.
  • Checking – Use an accurate tire gauge, not one at an air hose or gas station. Add air to your tires by putting the nozzle over the tire stem. Don’t hold it for too long; tire pressure increases rather quickly. To lower your tire pressure, press the needle in the middle of the valve.

Honda Ridgeline Rock Drop

2017 Honda Ridgeline - Fort Smith, AR
The 2017 Ridgeline is built to endure even the most extreme conditions thanks to its toughness.

The internet watched as Chevrolet delivered a major blow to the Ford F-150’s aluminum body – literally. The rock drop scratched and dented the Silverado 1500 and left major punctures in the F-150’s aluminum bed. As it turns out, Honda was also watching closely, and the Japanese automaker took the challenge to prove it was just as tough as American-made trucks.

To do so, Honda performed the same rock drop into a Ridgeline’s standard composite bed. A whopping total of 830 lbs. of concrete blocks fell from a height of about five feet into the bare bed. The end result? A few scratches, no dents, and nothing even remotely close to a puncture. Even better, the black composite hid the scratches so they were barely noticeable.

As an added bonus, the tailgate still worked perfectly and the in-bed trunk was unscathed, neither of which Chevrolet showed in their ad. While both the F-150 and Silverado 1500 have add-on bed liners, the Honda Ridgeline doesn’t seem to need one.

The Ridgeline rock drop proved that Honda’s full-size pickup’s bed is more durable than both the Silverado 1500’s steel and the F-150’s aluminum. All three trucks compete with the Ram 1500 and Nissan Titan.

Now that Honda’s thrown down the goblet, who will pick it up?